About your Search

20120901
20120930
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
and commerce committee and currently co-chair of the congressional piracy caucus. representative barton, in the few days and in the lame duck session of the 112 congress, do you foresee any action on the issues of privacy? >> i have asked the chair of the commerce committee -- i don't have a commitment from him, but that bill is a possible, especially in the lame duck then in the regular session. we probably won't have that many more legislative days. if we have one bill, that is the one i have asked the chairman to consider moving. >> would you like to see more comprehensive privacy legislation passed by congress? >> i would. i think the public is ahead of the congress on privacy. i think that companies like microsoft and some of those guys are ahead. they are building in the fall positions to have more and more privacy. but in the congress, we're still a bit behind of the curve. although, we have gained a lot of ground in this congress. our privacy caucus in the house, subcommittee chairman markey has cochaired with me, a republican and democrat. we have 30 members. so it does not qui
, former chairman of the energy and commerce committee and currently the co-chair of the congressional privacy caucus. representative barton command a few days and then the lame-duck sessions of the 112 congress, do you foresee any action on the issues of privacy? >> being handled? >> i've asked the chairman of the commerce committee to consider moving the do not track kids online privacy bill the congressman markey and i have introduced. i don't have a commitment from him to do that, but that bill is a possible, especially in the lame-duck. in the regular session we are probably not bring to have that more legislative days. succumb if we have one bill, though that would -- that is the one that i've asked the chairman to consider. >> would you like to see more comprehensive legislation? >> i would. i think the public is ahead of the congress of privacy and companies like microsoft building in their default positions to have more and more privacy, but in the congress we are still behind the curve. we have gained a lot of ground in the congress and our privacy caucus in the house the co-
texas, former chairman of the energy and commerce committee and currently co-chair of the congressional privacy caucus. representative barton, in the few days and then lame duck session of the 112th congress, do you foresee any actions on the issues of privacy being handled? >> guest: i have asked chairman upton of the energy and commerce committee to consider moving the do not track kids online privacy bill that congressman markey and i have introduced. i don't have a commitment for him to do that, but that bill is a possible, especially in the lame duck. in the regular session, we're probably not going to have that many more legislative days. so if we had one bill, though, that would -- that's the one i've asked the chairman to consider moving. >> host: would you like to see more comprehensive privacy legislation considered and passed by congress? >> guest: i would. i think the public is ahead of the congress on privacy, and i think, you know, companies like microsoft and some of of those guys are ahead. i mean, they're building in their default positions. they have more and more priv
was the chairman of the commerce manufacturing trade subcommittee for the energy and commerce committee and representative coming you just held a hearing recently on apps. what was the point of the hearing? >> to make sure that we explore what is going on in this area and there are so many jobs being created and we want to make sure any policies we put forward in washington don't squash the ballooning industry. ten years ago, 15 years ago, nobody thought of this. it's a relatively new industry that has been unleashed because of great ideas and we certainly don't want the government to come and destroy that. >> what were some of the problems that you saw in this area that he would like to address? >> one of the biggest problems is the work force. they are still looking for more people to move into this industry to develop that and work on creating the applications and all that goes into. that's the biggest problem that fewer people have that somehow in washington we are going to decide your way to tell liver but how to do their business or how not to do their business and hurt a growing
is representative mary bono mack who is the chairman of the commerce, manufacturing and trade subcommittee for energy and commerce committee, and, representative bono mack, you just held a hearing recently on apps. what was the point of your hearing? >> guest: well, the point was to make sure we explore what's going well in this area. there are so many jobs that are being created there, we want to make sure any policies we put forward in washington don't squash a blooming industry, a blooming, you know, ten years ago, fifteen years ago, nobody thought of this. it's a relatively new industry that has been unleashed because of great ideas, and we certainly don't want the government to come in and i do that. >> host: and what were some of the problems that you saw in this area that you'd like to address? >> guest: you know, one of the biggest problems is the work force, that they're still looking for more and more people to move into this industry to develop apps, to work on creating apps, all that goes into it. basically, that's the biggest problem, i think, the fears people have, of course,
are of increasing consequence in our foreign policy. it is increasingly the backbone for communications in commerce around the world. so for us, it is just a tool, but it is an important tool. we use it for communications. we have 288 facebook pages with 13 million fans. i think we have almost 200 official twitter accounts with a couple million followers. we are using it for communication, but of greater consequence in my opinion is part of what we are looking at our some really tough traditional foreign policy challenges -- are some really tough traditional foreign-policy challenges and thinking about how we can apply to america's unique strengths of our ability and technology and see how we can apply this to any given foreign policy challenge. >> when you release information via facebook or twitter -- >> we do. there are times when the official statement from our spokesperson or from the department will come over twitter. it is interesting to think about syria. no member of the united states government will ever be able to get a fair shake on syrian media, and we have a terrific ambassador to syr
. what we're trying to do is increase commerce between the united states and other countries. what we're doing is debunk myths about the united states. so a lot of the not about politics per se. in term who we are reaching. there are over 5 billion mobile hand sets on planet earth. the average mobile penetration in developed country is about 116%. in developing countries, t about 70 or 0eu%. most of the people are using the hand sets to access social media platforms the state department publishes. we're reaching frankly large numbers of individuals the world around. there are about 2.4 the number is going to be three billion in the near future. what's also interesting to us is think about this from a development perspective and thinking about how, for example, sub-saharan africa or south-central asia are becoming connected how can the development programs can be more effective. how can we increase the health and well being. going above and beyond just traditional communication. glis you talk about gyre carats around the world and how you see their -- not all of them. exactly. we wante
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7